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Supply Chain Management Jobs

Gain career security by mastering supply chain strategy.

The demand for strategic supply chain professionals is at an all-time high due to global business expansion and the logistical needs that are required to support such growth. Supply and distribution systems have become increasingly complex, with the aim of maximizing efficiency while minimizing cost which means the employment market for supply chain professionals is at its prime.

Employment growth for supply chain and logistics professionals is projected to grow between 2014 and 2024.1

In May 2016, the median annual wages reported by the Bureau of Labor Statistics for supply chain and logistics professionals in the top five industries showed:

Federal government, excluding Postal Service $82,660
Aerospace product and parts manufacturing $69,150
Transportation equipment manufacturing $54,530
Manufacturing $73,880
Professional, scientific, and technical services $75,000

Common Supply Chain Career Paths

  • International Logistics Manager
    Works closely with manufacturing, marketing and purchasing to create timely, cost-effective import/export supply chains. Responsible for handling the technical details of international transportation—multiple modes, complex documentation and varying customs regulations, developing distribution strategies, and building relationships with logistics intermediaries. Serves as a troubleshooter, dealing with problems inherent in moving freight long distances and holding inventory in multiple global locations.
  • Purchasing Manager
    Directs the buying activities for a company, government agency or organization. Responsible for identifying global sources of materials, selecting suppliers, arranging contracts and managing relationships. Coordinates with materials management and manufacturing to ensure timely delivery of the proper materials. Provides analysis to increase levels of service at reduced costs.
  • Supply Chain Software Manager
    Manages components of distribution technology including warehouse operations systems, electronic communication and order taking systems, and support systems. Designs analytical tools to increase and measure productivity. Develops decision support systems to analyze and optimize logistics and transportation systems.
  • Transportation Manager
    Directs the effectiveness of private, third party and contract carriage systems. Manages staff and operations to assure timely and cost efficient transportation of all incoming and outgoing shipments. Plans and assures adequate equipment for storage, loading and delivery of goods. Responsible for scheduling, routing, budget administration, freight bill presentation and contract negotiations. Works with international carriers and freight forwarders to streamline the flow of goods across international borders and through customs.
  • Warehouse Operations Manager
    Directs the efficient and cost-effective operation of commercial or industrial distribution center(s) or warehousing facilities. Manages inbound activities related to the receipt and storage of goods, inventory management and claims. Oversees outbound activities related to order-filling, stock replenishment, shipping. Responsible for budgeting, customer service, facility and equipment operation. Administers overall inventory management, productivity, accuracy, and loss prevention programs to ensure that customer requirements are met.

Related Degree Programs

1Source: Bureau of Labor Support, Accessed July 10, 2017 from http://www.bls.gov/ooh/business-and-financial/logisticians.htm#tab-6

Learn More

Learn more about Supply Chain Management at The University of Scranton by speaking with a Program Manager at 866-373-9547 or request more information.